Popular fallacy essays

Now I certainly don’t expect gold prices to slip under $1000, let alone plunge to $800.  Gold’s recent lows were totally artificial , the product of unsustainable extreme record gold-futures shorting .  But since these low gold prices breed endless hyper-bearish commentary, realize that even if the bears miraculously prove right the gold-mining industry is not at risk .  Today’s mix of major gold miners could keep right on producing.

One problem with styling the opposition to Trump a resistance is that it is an empty signifier; it has no content. Its value is entirely in the title itself rather than in any activity it describes. Thus, resistance becomes the name, not the deed. Moreover, when opposition to Trump is elevated to the level of resistance, Trump too is elevated: Resistance is for existential threats, meaning Trump must be one. But while the term says too much and does too little, making it particularly ill-suited as an appellation for Trump’s opponents, its grandiosity and romanticism are precisely why it appeals to them.

In a similar vein, Bentham famously opens his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1781/1991) with this:

Journalist Catherine Putz commented on the phrase in a 2016 article for the international news magazine The Diplomat , and compared it to use of whataboutism by businessman and politician Donald Trump: "Criticisms of human rights in the Soviet Union were often met with what became a common catchphrase: 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [59] She pointed out the folly of its use: "It demands, by default, for a state to argue abroad only in favor of ideals it has achieved the highest perfection in." [59] Writing for the liberal Israeli newspaper Haaretz , Israeli journalist Chemi Shalev made a similar comparison: "Trump told the New York Times this week that America is in such a mess in terms of civil liberties that it cannot lecture foreign countries anymore, which is an echo of old Soviet propaganda that responded to American reprimands with the retort 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [13] Shalev followed-up on this analysis in a subsequent article, writing: "Trump conducts pro-Russian propaganda along the same lines as the old retort 'And You Hang Blacks' with which the Soviets tried to deflect . criticism of their human rights abuses. He isn't troubled by Putin's political opponents being murdered, because 'people get killed here too'." [60] Writing for ChinaFile after Trump won the 2016 . election, James Palmer feared an increase in racism "would give a brutal new credibility to the old Soviet whataboutism whenever they were challenged on the gulag: 'But in America, you lynch Negroes'." [61] In her work Security Threats and Public Perception , Elizaveta Gaufman characterized the phrase as a form of reversing someone's line of reasoning against them. [14] Gaufman wrote that by using this phrase in an argument, one was tacitly refusing to answer queries posted to them and instead responding with condemnations. [14]

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

Journalist Catherine Putz commented on the phrase in a 2016 article for the international news magazine The Diplomat , and compared it to use of whataboutism by businessman and politician Donald Trump: "Criticisms of human rights in the Soviet Union were often met with what became a common catchphrase: 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [59] She pointed out the folly of its use: "It demands, by default, for a state to argue abroad only in favor of ideals it has achieved the highest perfection in." [59] Writing for the liberal Israeli newspaper Haaretz , Israeli journalist Chemi Shalev made a similar comparison: "Trump told the New York Times this week that America is in such a mess in terms of civil liberties that it cannot lecture foreign countries anymore, which is an echo of old Soviet propaganda that responded to American reprimands with the retort 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [13] Shalev followed-up on this analysis in a subsequent article, writing: "Trump conducts pro-Russian propaganda along the same lines as the old retort 'And You Hang Blacks' with which the Soviets tried to deflect . criticism of their human rights abuses. He isn't troubled by Putin's political opponents being murdered, because 'people get killed here too'." [60] Writing for ChinaFile after Trump won the 2016 . election, James Palmer feared an increase in racism "would give a brutal new credibility to the old Soviet whataboutism whenever they were challenged on the gulag: 'But in America, you lynch Negroes'." [61] In her work Security Threats and Public Perception , Elizaveta Gaufman characterized the phrase as a form of reversing someone's line of reasoning against them. [14] Gaufman wrote that by using this phrase in an argument, one was tacitly refusing to answer queries posted to them and instead responding with condemnations. [14]

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

In a similar vein, Bentham famously opens his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1781/1991) with this:

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popular fallacy essays
Popular fallacy essays

Journalist Catherine Putz commented on the phrase in a 2016 article for the international news magazine The Diplomat , and compared it to use of whataboutism by businessman and politician Donald Trump: "Criticisms of human rights in the Soviet Union were often met with what became a common catchphrase: 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [59] She pointed out the folly of its use: "It demands, by default, for a state to argue abroad only in favor of ideals it has achieved the highest perfection in." [59] Writing for the liberal Israeli newspaper Haaretz , Israeli journalist Chemi Shalev made a similar comparison: "Trump told the New York Times this week that America is in such a mess in terms of civil liberties that it cannot lecture foreign countries anymore, which is an echo of old Soviet propaganda that responded to American reprimands with the retort 'And you are lynching Negroes'." [13] Shalev followed-up on this analysis in a subsequent article, writing: "Trump conducts pro-Russian propaganda along the same lines as the old retort 'And You Hang Blacks' with which the Soviets tried to deflect . criticism of their human rights abuses. He isn't troubled by Putin's political opponents being murdered, because 'people get killed here too'." [60] Writing for ChinaFile after Trump won the 2016 . election, James Palmer feared an increase in racism "would give a brutal new credibility to the old Soviet whataboutism whenever they were challenged on the gulag: 'But in America, you lynch Negroes'." [61] In her work Security Threats and Public Perception , Elizaveta Gaufman characterized the phrase as a form of reversing someone's line of reasoning against them. [14] Gaufman wrote that by using this phrase in an argument, one was tacitly refusing to answer queries posted to them and instead responding with condemnations. [14]

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Popular fallacy essays

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

One problem with styling the opposition to Trump a resistance is that it is an empty signifier; it has no content. Its value is entirely in the title itself rather than in any activity it describes. Thus, resistance becomes the name, not the deed. Moreover, when opposition to Trump is elevated to the level of resistance, Trump too is elevated: Resistance is for existential threats, meaning Trump must be one. But while the term says too much and does too little, making it particularly ill-suited as an appellation for Trump’s opponents, its grandiosity and romanticism are precisely why it appeals to them.

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

In a similar vein, Bentham famously opens his Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (1781/1991) with this:

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popular fallacy essays

Popular fallacy essays

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Popular fallacy essays

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Popular fallacy essays

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